first_imgŠKODA unveiled its all-electric VISION iV concept at the Geneva Motor Show, a crossover coupe based on Volkswagen’s MEB platform that “offers a look ahead at ŠKODA’s electric future.” more…The post ŠKODA debuts all-electric VISION iV concept appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img


first_img Tesla Releases Full Model Y Reveal Video: Watch It Here Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 20, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Why We Need To Be Underwhelmed By The Tesla Model Y Some say the Tesla Model Y reveal wasn’t that convincing. Others beg to differ.Tesla owner and YouTuber Andy Slye was one of many fans that were fortunate to attend the recent Tesla Model Y reveal. If you watched Trevor Page’s (Model 3 Owners Club) video coverage in our livestream article, you likely saw Andy enjoying himself at the event. He made it clear that he wasn’t attending with plans to place an order on a Model Y. Instead, he was just there to take it all in.More Tesla Model Y Content: Many reports have talked about the event’s lack of anticipated fanfare. Some have even gone so far as to say it was underwhelming. So, does this mean few people are going to actually purchase a Model Y?There’s really know way of knowing for sure at this point. However, if we look at the incredible popularity of the Tesla Model 3, it seems the Y is going to be at least as well-received, and likely much more popular. It’s essentially a Model 3 with greater versatility, and it’s priced well. To put it in perspective, the Model Y appears to be about the size of the Jaguar I-Pace, though it has considerably more cargo volume and offers third-row seating. Model Y variants will also offer more range than the I-Pace, and it has a starting price that’s over $20,000 less.Check out the video to learn what Andy thinks. Then, share your thoughts with us in the comment section below.Video Description via Andy Slye on YouTube:Why I Ordered A Tesla Model Y Even Though I Didn’t Want One: VideoTesla Model Y is an all-electric compact SUV with 300 miles of range. Is it worth buying?I attended the Tesla Model Y event last night in Hawthorne, CA. I was able to see the #ModelY up close and personal and even took a test ride in it. Here are my thoughts from a Model 3 owner’s perspective.Safety:Like every #Tesla , Model Y is designed to be the safest vehicle in its class. The low center of gravity, rigid body structure and large crumple zones provide unparalleled protection.Utility:Room for up to seven adults with optional third row. Versatile seating and storage for cargo and passengers. Easy access to the trunk makes loading and unloading convenient. #TeslaModelY provides maximum versatility—able to carry 7 passengers and their cargo. Each second row seat folds flat independently, creating flexible storage for skis, furniture, luggage and more. The liftgate opens to a low trunk floor that makes loading and unloading easy and quick.Dual Motor Option:Independent motors digitally control torque to the front and rear wheels. Quickest acceleration – from zero to 60 mph in as little as 3.5 seconds. Capable in rain, snow, mud and off-road with superior traction control. Tesla All-Wheel Drive has two ultra-responsive, independent electric motors that digitally control torque to the front and rear wheels—for far better handling, traction and stability control. Model Y is capable in rain, snow, mud and off-road.Range:300 miles: the longest electric range of any sport utility vehicle on the road. Recharge 168 miles in 15 minutes at Supercharger locations. 12K+ Superchargers placed along well-traveled routes around the world. Model Y is fully electric, so you never need to visit a gas station again. If you charge overnight at home, you can wake up to a full battery every morning. And when you’re on the road, it’s easy to plug in along the way—at any public station or with the Tesla charging network. We currently have over 12,000 Superchargers worldwide, with six new locations opening every week.Autopilot:All new Tesla cars come standard with emergency braking, collision warning, blind-spot monitoring and more. Model Y will have Full Self-Driving capability, enabling automatic driving on city streets and highways pending regulatory approval, as well as the ability to come find you anywhere in a parking lot.Interior:15” touchscreen and over-the-air software updates. With an elevated seating position and low dash, the driver has a commanding view of the road ahead. The interior of Model Y is simple and clean, with a 15-inch touch screen, immersive sound system and an expansive all-glass roof that creates extra headroom and provides a seamless view of the sky. Tesla Model Y: Everything We Know So Far, Plus Q&A: Videolast_img read more


first_imgThe VW ID.R, an all-electric race car built by Volkswagen to beat some racing records, has officially run the fastest emission-free lap of all time on the Nürburgring-Nordschleife. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post VW ID.R electric racecar runs fastest emission-free lap of all time on the Nürburgring-Nordschleife appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img


first_img Username Password Remember me How Brexit will impact businesses having a presence in or trading with the UK and the EU is still largely unknown and will remain so for some time. This article outlines the likely timeline of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU, how these will affect the regulatory landscape and the steps that Texas businesses may consider to deal with regulatory change . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Lost your password? Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img


first_img « More Insanity from the Climate Group without Supporting Evidence QUESTION: Mr. Armstrong, in relating your comments on weather and how the winters will spike to record cold and then the summers will spike to record highs, is this the same as a panic cycle in markets?HCANSWER: Yes. Our computer looks at the weather the same as it does with the price in a market. Patterns emerge and you can understand the causes ONLY by correlating the trends with everything else. This is indeed a Panic Cycle where we exceed the previous high and penetrate the previous low. This coming weekend will see temperatures break 100 in the Northeast. I have lived in New Jersey and there were plenty of summers where we have days at 103. This is NOT abnormal. What is abnormal is the volatility how we can go from a winter where it was colder in Chicago than it was in Antarctica and then we break the record highs in July. It is the VOLATILITY – not the empirical level of temperature we should be paying attention to. Categories: Climate last_img read more


first_img Source:http://www.parkinsons.org.uk/ This study is the most robust evidence to date that there is a link between Parkinson’s and type 2 diabetes.The vast majority of people with diabetes will not go on to develop Parkinson’s. Studies that demonstrate type 2 diabetes is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s suggest, however, that the two conditions may affect cells in similar ways.Understanding the link between these two conditions could be key to developing treatments that slow the course of Parkinson’s, something that no current treatments can do.Currently, there is much interest in the potential for anti-diabetic drugs, such as exenatide, to slow the progression of Parkinson’s. The ability to repurpose these drugs, which are already used to treat people with diabetes, could speed up the delivery of new and better treatments to people with Parkinson’s who urgently need them.” Jun 14 2018A new study by UCL, University of Oxford and Queen Mary University of London researchers suggests that people with type 2 diabetes are 32% more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than those without diabetes.Dr Beckie Port, Research Manager at Parkinson’s UK, said:last_img read more


first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A few years ago, Jihye Yun, then a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, found that colon cancer cells whose growth is driven by mutations in the gene KRAS or a less commonly mutated gene, BRAF, make unusually large amounts of a protein that transports glucose across the cell membrane. The transporter, GLUT1, supplies the cells with the high levels of glucose they need to survive. GLUT1 also transports the oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), into the cell, bad news for cancer cells, because Yun found that DHA can deplete a cell’s supply of a chemical that sops up free radicals. Because free radicals can harm a cell in various ways, the finding suggested “a vulnerability” if the cells were flooded with DHA, says Lewis Cantley at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, where Yun is now a postdoc.Cantley’s lab and collaborators found that large doses of vitamin C did indeed kill cultured colon cancer cells with BRAF or KRAS mutations by raising free radical levels, which in turn inactivate an enzyme needed to metabolize glucose, depriving the cells of energy. Then they gave daily high dose injections—equivalent to a person eating 300 oranges—to mice engineered to develop KRAS-driven colon tumors. The mice developed fewer and smaller colon tumors compared with control mice.Cantley hopes to soon start clinical trials that will select cancer patients based on KRAS or BRAF mutations and possibly GLUT1 status. His group’s new study “tells you who should get the drug and who shouldn’t,” he says. Cancer geneticist Bert Vogelstein of Johns Hopkins University, in whose lab Yun noticed the GLUT1 connection, is excited about vitamin C therapy, not only as a possible treatment for KRAS-mutated colon tumors, which make up about 40% of all colon cancers, but also for pancreatic cancer, a typically lethal cancer driven by KRAS. “No KRAS-targeted therapeutics have emerged despite decades of effort and hundreds of millions of dollars [spent] by both industry and academia,” Vogelstein says. Others caution that the effects seen in mice may not hold up in humans. But because high dose vitamin C is already known to be safe, says cancer researcher Vuk Stambolic of the University of Toronto in Canada, oncologists “can quickly move forward in the clinic.”One drawback is that patients will have to come into a clinic for vitamin C infusions, ideally every few days for months, because vitamin C seems to take that long to kill cancer cells, Levine notes. But Cantley says it may be possible to make an oral formulation that reaches high doses in the blood—which may be one way to get companies interested in sponsoring trials. Maybe Linus Pauling was on to something after all. Decades ago the Nobel Prize–winning chemist was relegated to the fringes of medicine after championing the idea that vitamin C could combat a host of illnesses, including cancer. Now, a study published online today in Science reports that vitamin C can kill tumor cells that carry a common cancer-causing mutation and—in mice—can curb the growth of tumors with the mutation.If the findings hold up in people, researchers may have found a way to treat a large swath of tumors that has lacked effective drugs. “This [could] be one answer to the question everybody’s striving for,” says molecular biologist Channing Der of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, one of many researchers trying to target cancers with the mutation. The study is also gratifying for the handful of researchers pursuing vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, as a cancer drug. “I’m encouraged. Maybe people will finally pay attention,” says vitamin C researcher Mark Levine of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. In 1971, Pauling began collaborating with a Scottish physician who had reported success treating cancer patients with vitamin C. But the failure of two clinical trials of vitamin C pills, conducted in the late 1970s and early 1980s at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, dampened enthusiasm for Pauling’s idea. Studies by Levine’s group later suggested that the vitamin must be given intravenously to reach doses high enough to kill cancer cells. A few small trials in the past 5 years—for pancreatic and ovarian cancer—hinted that IV vitamin C treatment combined with chemotherapy can extend cancer survival. But doubters were not swayed. “The atmosphere was poisoned” by the earlier failures, Levine says. Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more


first_imgIn the early 1900s, neurologist Korbinian Brodmann drew some of the first diagrams of the human cortex by hand, based on differences in cellular architecture that he could see under a microscope. For more than a century, scientists have continued using those maps, as well as those of neuroanatomists that followed in Brodmann’s footsteps. Now, neuroscientists have created a long-overdue update for those early diagrams, using anatomical and functional brain data from the Human Connectome Project—a large-scale, digitized effort to map the brain’s functions and structures from hundreds of human samples. Previous attempts at mapping the cortex—the wrinkly, outermost layers of the brain responsible for sensory and motor processing, language, and reasoning—have had mixed results because some were based on small samples and others focused on just one aspect of brain structure or function. To create a more detailed map, the team looked at four measures of structure and function, including the thickness and number of folds in the cortex and what activity different regions displayed in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner during a given task. They gathered their data from 210 healthy adults, and then trained a machine-learning algorithm to detect distinct regional “fingerprints.” The program defined 180 distinct areas, including nearly 100 that have never been described before, the scientists report today in Nature. The sharper, multilayered map will allow for more detailed comparisons between humans and other primates, shedding light on how our brains evolved, the scientists say. It could also prove a boon to neurosurgeons, as they decide where to insert their scalpels.last_img read more


first_img Forde for Congress Forde spoke with ScienceInsider both before and after his defeat, offering some advice to scientists weighing their own bids for elective office and reflecting on his own campaign. For many first-time congressional candidates with science and technology backgrounds, fundraising can be a major obstacle. Not to Brian Forde, who was once a  senior technology adviser to former-President Barack Obama. Forde managed to outpace his Democrat rivals by raising some $1.5 million for his southern California House race, including more than $300,000 in contributions via cryptocurrencies.But on 5 June Forde received only 6% of the vote, leaving him a distant fourth in the open, top-two primary to represent California’s 45th congressional district in Orange County. Democrat Katie Porter, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), edged out fellow UCI law professor Dave Min for the right to challenge incumbent Republican Mimi Walters in the November general election.The 38-year-old Democrat stands by his message that Congress needs more technologists to do its job. Exhibit A, he says, are all the legislators who struggled to keep up with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg when he testified this spring. But the knowledge gained from a tech career that gave him the chance to brief Obama on the emerging world of cryptocurrencies—and then to create a digital currency initiative within the Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge—wasn’t nearly enough to win a seat in Congress. Political smarts are even more important, he acknowledges. By Jeffrey MervisJun. 28, 2018 , 8:30 AM Email Brian Forde brought a background in technology to his run for Congress. The science vote Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Q: Looking back, is there anything you would have done differently?A: I would have started running earlier. [Porter and Min declared in April 2017, and Forde jumped in last summer.] As a first-time candidate, it’s like when you’re a child, and every month of growth is massive. Being naturally cautious, a scientist or technologist might be inclined to wait and not jump in until you have everything lined up. But you need to let go of that idea and realize that you’re going to learn a lot once you start running.Q: How did you go about attracting support from a community that has traditionally stayed away from politics?A: You have to give them a compelling reason why something they care about is under attack. And if it’s not, then what are you fighting for that they care about?For example, I was running against a candidate who fundamentally doesn’t understand, or care to understand, cryptocurrency. [Min ran an ad that accused Forde of taking crypto donations from “Bitcoin speculators that oppose cracking down on drug deals and human trafficking.”] And while most people in that space haven’t been active politically, they were more than happy to contribute to my campaign because the alternative was having someone who clearly did not understand this emerging technology and who perpetuated lies about the technology.center_img Q: You’ve said Zuckerberg’s testimony was an embarrassing example of how poorly Congress understands tech. What will it take to close that gap?A: I think that we are going to need more congressional hearings that look like the Zuckerberg hearing, in which Congress makes a fool of itself with regard to science and technology. Once we have more of these examples, it becomes part of a greater national narrative of what we need in Congress.Q: How can scientists help?A: The thing about technology is that before the ink is dry on a piece of legislation, the technology has already changed. So you need people who understand where it’s going and can see around corners. The problem is that if the only thing a member of Congress has heard about technology are 4-minute attacks from people who don’t know what they are talking about, it’s going to be very hard to have a productive conversation with that member in a way that helps Americans.But here’s a thought: How many scientists have sent their member of Congress a one-pager, a blog post, or a research paper with a note that says, “Here’s a quick way to help you get up to speed on this issue, because I heard you say something that wasn’t quite accurate? Or would you like me to host a roundtable, bringing together people with expertise on this issue?”Those types of efforts can massively impact the perspective of an elected official—or even a candidate. Of course, there’s still the question of whether the member or the candidate is willing to listen.Q: What’s next for you?A: It’s too soon to say. I haven’t even talked about it with my wife [Alison Grigonis, a lawyer who also worked in the Obama White House as a liaison between the president and his Cabinet]. But I’m effusively supportive of Katie [Porter] and have told every one of my supporters that I would appreciate if they would consider doing so, both in terms of financial support and in volunteer hours. And I’ll do anything she asks of me, because the most important thing is to flip this seat. Science candidates: High-tech smarts aren’t enough for defeated Obama aide Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates. The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 Meet the scientists running to transform Congress in 2018 Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more


first_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Our condolences go out to Terrill Thomas’ family.SEE ALSO:Outrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesDavid Clarke Has Sunken Place Meltdown After Cory Booker Destroys DHS Secretary On Live TV More By NewsOne Staff Black Lives Matter , David Clarke , Milwaukee Former Milwaukee County Sheriff David A. Clarke is one of President Donald Trump’s most loyal Black supporters. However, what is most important to know about him is, according to The Washington Post, at least four people died in the Milwaukee County jail that he managed from April 2015 to November 2016 — including a newborn baby whose birth occurred unbeknownst to staff. In a separate incident, his workers were accused of refusing to give water for a week to an inmate, who later died. The Most Ridiculous Photos From Trump’s Farce Of A Black History Month Celebrationcenter_img Now, the family of one of those victims is getting a massive settlement.SEE ALSO: David Clarke Retains Master’s Degree After Embarrassing Struggle To Correct PlagiarismAccording to The Associated Press, Milwaukee County paid nearly $7 million to settle a lawsuit from the family of Terrill Thomas “whose dehydration death in jail was described by his attorneys as torture.” The settlement went public this week but it was finalized in March.Attorneys for the family said, “The size of the settlement I believe reflected the tremendous pain and suffering that Mr. Thomas endured for days.” The attorneys also said it is one of the largest ever in Wisconsin for a jail death.Terrill Thomas, 38, was having a mental breakdown he was arrested on April 14, 2016. He allegedly shot a man in front of his parents’ home and then fire a gun inside a casino.While in jail, his water turned off because he supposedly flooded another cell by stuffing a mattress in the toilet. The Associated Press reports, “The water was never turned back on and he died a week later. He lost 34 pounds (15.5 kilograms), or 10 percent of his body weight, during the week he was deprived of water, according to the lawsuit.”Erik Heipt, a Seattle-based attorney who also represented Thomas’ family, said, “What happened to him was a form of torture. This sort of atrocity should never happen at an American jail. There’s no excuse for it.”The massive settlement will be split between Thomas’ six children (four are minors). The lawsuit against the jail, which, again, happened on David Clarke’s watch, is now dismissed. A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ President Donald Trump Participates In A Reception For National African-American History Month Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more


first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Juan V. Albarracin-Jordan and José M. Capriles In 2010, Miller joined the team to help chemically analyze the items, which had been nearly perfectly preserved in the arid conditions of the 4000-meter-high mountains. Radiocarbon dating revealed that the outer bag was made around 1000 C.E. Next, Miller carefully unwound the fox snout pouch and emptied its dust and debris onto a piece of aluminum foil. Using a technique frequently used in modern illicit drug testing called liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, she and her fellow researchers hunted for chemical signatures in the sample. They identified at least five psychoactive substances: cocaine, benzoylecgonine, bufotenine, harmine, and dimethyltryptamine.Harmine and dimethyltryptamine are the main ingredients in ayahuasca, used ceremonially for centuries by indigenous South Americans. Miller says their presence alongside the snuffing tube and tablet may mean that people inhaled these chemicals long before they were brewed into a beverage. When José Capriles arrived in 2008 at the Cueva del Chileno rock shelter, nestled on the western slopes of Bolivia’s Andes, he didn’t know what he would find within. Sweeping aside layers of fresh and ancient llama dung, he found the remains of an ancient burial site: stone markers suggesting a body had once been interred there and a small leather bag cinched with a string. Inside was a collection of ancient drug paraphernalia—bone spatulas to crush the seeds of plants with psychoactive compounds, wooden tablets inlaid with gemstones to serve as a crushing surface, a wooden snuffing tube with a carved humanoid figure, and a small pouch stitched together from the snouts of three foxes.Now, more than a decade later, Capriles—an anthropologist at Pennsylvania State University in State College—and colleagues have discovered that the 1000-year-old bag contains the most varied combination of psychoactive compounds found at a South American site, including cocaine and the primary ingredients in a hallucinogenic tea called ayahuasca. The contents suggest the users were well versed in the psychoactive properties of the substances, and also that they sourced their goods from well-established trade routes.“Whoever had this bag of amazing goodies … would have had to travel great distances to acquire those plants,” says Melanie Miller, lead author of a new study on the discovery and a bioarchaeologist at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. “[Either that], or they had really extensive exchange networks.” Nearly every culture on Earth has dabbled with consciousness- and perception-altering substances. Indigenous groups from Central and South America have used hallucinogens such as peyote and psilocybin mushrooms during rituals and religious ceremonies for thousands of years. Archaeologists have uncovered hundreds of items that provide a glimpse into these ancient practices, but few are as complete as the Bolivian find. Juan V. Albarracin-Jordan and José M. Capriles A snuffing tube was used to inhale ground-up plant matter with psychoactive compounds. Email By Michael PriceMay. 6, 2019 , 3:00 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Researchers discovered the mind-altering kit in the Cueva del Chileno rock shelter, high in the Bolivian Andes. Juan V. Albarracin-Jordan and José M. Capriles The mixture’s origins also offer clues to the trade routes of the people who occupied the high plains. Several of the compounds come from the plant genus Anadenanthera—also known as vilca, cebil, or yopo—which grows widely through South America, but not in this region of the Andes. Similarly, the likely source of the harmine is a lowland Amazonian species.Miller says it’s possible that the mixture of compounds was unique to the region. The fact that at least two of the ingredients are known to be used in tandem in ayahuasca raises the possibility that this shaman was selecting plant combinations for specific mind-altering effects, they report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “Maybe they were mixing multiple things together because they realized when they’re combined, they have a whole different set of experiences,” Miller says.When indigenous South Americans began to brew ayahuasca is still a major mystery, says Christine VanPool, an anthropologist at the University of Missouri in Columbia who wasn’t involved in the work. She’s intrigued by the idea they may first have discovered its properties by inhaling its key compounds. Shamans “say they’ve had [ayahuasca] for a very long time. So in some ways, I wasn’t surprised,” she says. But because archaeological evidence has been lacking, the new find is “exciting.” A pouch containing psychoactive compounds was stitched together from the snouts of three Andean foxes. Archaeologists find richest cache of ancient mind-altering drugs in South Americalast_img read more


first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail US-SCHOOL-SHOOTING-PROTEST-POLITICS Joy Behar , Meghan McCain , The View 95 Photos Of Black People Marching For Our Lives Meghan McCain clearly can’t take the heat and it looks like she is ready to get out of the kitchen. There are reports that  the 34-year-old is ready to leave “The View.”See Also: Ilhan Omar Reacts To Meghan McCain’s White TearsThe Daily Beast exclusively reports she can’t take all the bad press — meaning, she can’t handle when makes disgusting comments and people call her out. Sources claim she is “feeling like a caged animal” and she hates that she is seen as unreasonable, “manic” and “petulant child,” who has “crying fits” when she’s dragged on social media. After two seasons, McCain allegedly feels feels “so exhausted and defeated.” In addition, Abby Huntsman, who is currently on maternity leave, was supposedly hired by ABC to make Meghan “more comfortable.” Behar allegedly said, “If you want to know what white privilege looks like, this is a great example of it.”Well said.SEE ALSO:Meet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesTrump-Supporting DA Calls ‘Ghetto’ Maxine Waters A ‘Bitch,’ Can’t Believe She Hasn’t Been ShotThis Colin Kaepernick Retweet Says Everything You Need To Know About The NFL Players’ Anthem Grievance More By NewsOne Staff A so-called pal, which is probably someone on McCain team, told The Daily Beast, “It’s getting to the point where it’s not worth the emotional toll every week,” said a McCain pal, who asked not to be further identified. “If she doesn’t stay at The View, she will find other work.”The show’s executive producer Hilary Estey McLoughlin appeared to be defending her to The Daily Beast, “We don’t want people to attack Meghan. We’re happy to have Meghan there. I think she does want to be there. I think she wants to be on the show. She realizes it’s a very good platform for her and we love having her there. I feel like she will come back.”She then added, “What happens with Meghan is that because she’s so passionate about what she’s talking about, and she feels very strongly that she’s carrying this mantle for the conservative perspective, and what she wants to talk about is so important to her, I think that’s the part that’s the most draining for her.”Maybe McCain should stop being so evil and it would be easier on her. Back on June 19, she called 76-year-old Joy Behar a bitch on live television.However, this report isn’t too shocking. The heat on “The View” has allegedly been getting worse every day. According to a close source via The Daily Mail, “Whoopi is at her breaking point with Meghan. She’s been trying to hang in there, especially keep the peace with Meghan and Joy, but we all know she’s about to break.” A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racistlast_img read more


first_imgPhoto by Diana HutchisonHigh winds in excess of 50 mph caused dust storms throughout the area last week. On Thursday, April 12, according to Navajo County, Snowflake had recorded wind gusts of 76 mph. Navajo County also issued a weather alert on Thursday for dust storms blowing across State Route 77 both north and south of Holbrook. High winds in excess of 50 mph caused dust storms RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adcenter_img April 17, 2018last_img


first_img Advertising P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Related News New Zealand’s Finance Minister Grant Robertson speaks about the “wellbeing” budget in Wellington, New Zealand (Reuters)New Zealand unveiled plans on Thursday to spend up to NZ$3.8 billion ($2.47 billion) a year under its ‘wellbeing’ approach, which the government has touted as a new way of budgeting that moves beyond measuring just economic growth. Taking stock of monsoon rain ‘Uneven, two-paced’: Ex-cricketers slam pitch used in India-New Zealand semifinal The budget forecast an operating surplus of NZ$3.5 billion for the year ending June, up from NZ$1.7 billion forecast in December. The country’s debt is forecast to drop to 19.9% by 2022.GOALS MISSEDDespite enjoying a ‘rockstar’ economy for years, some New Zealanders have felt left behind due to the rising inequality.Ardern, the popular 38-year-old Prime Minister, came to power in 2017 with an agenda of social justice and promising to make the economy “work for all New Zealanders”.Some questioned whether the budget had lived up to the government’s stated goals to transform the economy and pointed out that the spending increase was still relatively modest as the government stuck firmly to its targets of paying down debt. More Explained Post Comment(s) Much of the excitement around the ‘wellbeing’ budget was dampened after some plans of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s government were released earlier by the opposition party.The Labour-led government allocated over a billion dollars each for issues like mental health and child poverty. It also targeted funds towards tackling domestic violence, and for infrastructure projects like rail, hospitals and schools.“We are measuring our country’s success differently,” said Finance minister Grant Robertson. “We are not just relying on Gross Domestic Product (GDP), but also how we are improving the wellbeing of our people, protecting the environment and strengthening of our communities.” Tens of thousands of New Zealand teachers staged the country’s largest strike on Wednesday, and doctors, nurses and others also threatening industrial action this year for higher pay and shorter hours. By Reuters |Wellington | Updated: May 30, 2019 9:52:10 am After loss, New Zealand’s Jimmy Neesham tweets advising kids not to take up sports Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off “They have spent on their priorities that they stated they would but I just don’t get the sense that its the transformation that we have been promised,” said Ganesh Nana, chief economist at Wellington economic think tank BERL.Critics, many in the Labour’s left-wing base, already felt the government has already missed key opportunities to fulfill its transformative goals.Ardern made a surprise U-turn in April by ruling out a capital gains tax during her tenure, long a Labour policy to tackle wealth inequality. Advertising Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 New Zealand can fire in semi-finals: Coach Gary Stead Advertising Best Of Express The budget increases annual operating allowance for new spending to $3.8 billion per year over the four-year forecast period, from $2.4 billion in the previous budget.The operating allowance for budget 2020 has also increased to $3.0 billion from $2.4 billion.The Treasury department downgraded its gross domestic product forecasts to 2.1% in the year ending June 30, 2019, compared to 2.9% predicted in December, hurt by a cooling global economy and slowing domestic consumption.GDP was forecast at 3.2% in fiscal 2020, and was seen averaging at about 2.6 percent over the forecasted four-year period.Robertson said the economy faces continuing risks from the U.S.-China trade disputes and Brexit.last_img read more


first_img China opens first overseas base in Africa: media reports Related News “The exercise met our expected objective. It is very significant for our unmanned logistics chain in future warfare,” said Bi Guangyuan, executive director of the exercise, CCTV reported.Chinese military analysts predicted that more unmanned transport aircraft could join the army’s logistics arsenal for long-range and heavy delivery in the future, state-run Global Times reported. “We … explored a new model of military cargo delivery in joint combat as well as in strategic and tactical logistics support,” Li said.Since transport planes usually do not need to make intense and complicated manoeuvres like fighter jets, even heavier cargo delivery missions could become unmanned if this technology becomes mature, a Chinese military expert told the Global Times.Airdrops often take place within the range of hostile anti-aircraft fire, so being unmanned lowers risk to life, the expert said.The exercise also means that the Chinese military now has the first large unmanned equipment in its logistics arsenal, the CCTV report said, noting that the mission was carried out on a plateau with a complicated terrain. By PTI |Beijing | Published: June 24, 2019 12:09:31 pm Best Of Express China says military drills ahead of Taiwan inauguration part of annual plan After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertisingcenter_img China developing world’s fastest armoured vehicle runs on both water and land Chinese military analysts predicted that more unmanned transport aircraft could join the army’s logistics arsenal for long-range and heavy delivery in the future, (REUTERS)The Chinese military has tested an unmanned transport plane that successfully delivered cargo at a designated area, making it a future prospect for airdropping cargo through parachutes in real battle conditions, official media here reported on Monday. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Post Comment(s) Jointly held by the National Defence University of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and the state-owned China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, the aerial delivery exercise took place recently in Zhangye, Northwest China’s Gansu Province, China Central Television (CCTV) reported.The exercise featured an unmanned single-engine biplane, the designation of which was not revealed, as it carried a cargo of military supplies and successfully airdropped it into a target zone, according to the CCTV report.This is the first time China has conducted a parachuted aerial delivery of cargo weighing more than 500 kilograms on a flight distance of more than 500 kms with an unmanned transport aircraft, CCTV quoted Li Ruixing, the president of the PLA National Defence University’s joint logistics academy as saying.last_img read more


first_img heathrow airport, body found heathrow airport, body found, nairobi london flight, Kenya airways, indian express Kenya Airways said Monday that police traced the body to its Nairobi-London flight.Police and airline officials say a stowaway fell from the landing gear of a jet as it approached London’s Heathrow Airport after a 9-hour flight from Nairobi. London Bridge attack suspect’s sister sacked from UK airport job The Metropolitan Police force says the body of an unidentified man was found in a south London garden on Sunday, and it’s believed he fell from a plane.He has not yet been identified.Kenya Airways said Monday that police traced the body to its Nairobi-London flight. A bag, water and food were discovered in the plane’s landing-gear compartment.Though not common, stowaways have in the past plunged to the streets of London as planes lowered their landing gear. In September 2012, a 30-year old from Mozambique, Jose Matada, died after falling from the undercarriage of a Heathrow-bound flight from Angola. Several UK flights cancelled as Hurricane Gonzalo strikes Related News Man stabs himself in front of passengers with knife bought at Heathrow Airport Advertising By AP |London | Published: July 1, 2019 11:10:09 pm 2 Comment(s)last_img read more


Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 19 2018Scientists say more should be done to tackle the growing environmental impact of takeaway food containers.A new study estimates there are 2025 million takeaway containers per year being used in the European Union (EU) alone. It also says finding a way to recycle disposable takeaway containers could help reduce equivalent greenhouse gas emissions generated annually by 55,000 cars.The researchers, from The University of Manchester, have carried out the first ever comprehensive study of the environmental impacts of disposable takeaway-food containers. They looked at aluminium, polystyrene (styrofoam) and polypropylene (clear plastic) containers. These were compared to reusable plastic containers, such as “Tupperware”.For example, the study found that whilst Styrofoam containers have the lowest carbon footprint – 50% lower than aluminium containers and three times lower than their plastic counterparts – they cannot be considered a sustainable packaging as they are not recycled at a mass level and often end up in landfill.The global takeaway food market is growing fast, with a projected value of over £80 billion in 2020. The sector uses a vast amount of disposable takeaway containers, estimated in this study at 2025 million units per year in the European Union (EU) alone.Despite this, the scale of the impacts on the environment of takeaway-food containers used in this growing sector was not measured until now.The study used life cycle assessment (LCA) to estimate the impacts of containers, taking into account their manufacture, use and end-of-life waste management. Altogether, the research team investigated 12 different environmental impacts, including climate change, depletion of natural resources and marine ecotoxicity.The study found that the styrofoam container was the best option among the disposable containers across all the impacts considered, including the carbon footprint. For example, the styrofoam container had 50% lower carbon footprint than aluminium and three times lower than the plastic. This is because of the lower amount of materials and energy used in the production of styrofoam compared to the other two types of container.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchHowever, styrofoam containers are currently not recycled and cannot be considered a sustainable packaging option. The study estimates that recycling half of the containers currently in use, as envisaged by the EU recycling policy for the year 2025, would reduce their carbon footprint by a third. This would save 61,700?t CO2 eq. per year at the EU level, equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions generated annually by 55,000 cars. Most other impacts would be reduced by more than 20%.Dr Alejandro Gallego-Schmid, the lead author, explains: ‘Achieving this level of recycling of styrofoam containers is going to be challenging. Although technically possible and practiced at small scale in some countries, the main difficulties are related to collecting the used containers and the associated costs.’Dr Joan Fernandez Mendoza, one of the study authors, added: ‘Because they are so light, the styrofoam containers can easily be blown away, contributing to urban and marine litter. So, despite their lower life cycle environmental impacts relative to the other containers, styrofoam containers cannot be considered a sustainable packaging option unless they can be recycled at a large scale.’The study also found that reusable Tupperware containers had a lower carbon footprint than disposable styrofoam when they were reused more than 18 times. This is despite the energy and water used for their cleaning. Disposable clear-plastic containers needed to be reused even fewer times – only five – to become better for the carbon footprint than the styrofoam.Professor Adisa Azapagic, the project leader, commented: ‘As consumers, we can play a significant role in reducing the environmental impacts of food packaging by reusing food containers as long as possible. Our study shows clearly that the longer we reuse them, the lower their impacts become over their extended lifetimes.’ Source:https://www.manchester.ac.uk/ read more


first_imgPowassan virus, a member of the flavivirus family to which Zika belongs, is still rare, but it can be deadly–and as with many emerging diseases, there was previously no known prevention or treatment for it. This new vaccine is based on a vaccine platform that Diamond and his colleagues used to develop a potential vaccine for Zika: mRNA from the virus in question, encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP), produces subviral particles that share many features of the virus and provoke an immune reaction that produces protective antibodies. In mice, the new vaccine was effective after one dose against two different strains of Powassan virus and against the more distantly related Langat virus.This work suggests that the LNP-encapsulated modified mRNA vaccine platform could be used to produce vaccine candidates for other flaviviruses by substituting in mRNA from the virus the researchers want to target. Diamond and his colleagues hope that this could be a way to rapidly produce potential vaccines for new flaviviruses as they emerge and before they become epidemics.”We are excited that this mRNA-based vaccine against Powassan virus was highly immunogenic and conferred protection against multiple members of the family. We plan to continue studying the molecular basis for its broadly neutralizing antibody activity and test the vaccine against additional related viruses,” he says.Source: https://www.cell.com/ Dec 27 2018A group of researchers led by Michael Diamond of Washington University in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that is effective in mice against Powassan virus, an emerging tick-borne virus that can cause life-threatening encephalitis in humans. They also show that the vaccine produces antibodies that can protect the mice against other, related tick-transmitted flaviviruses. Their findings appear December 18 in the journal Cell Reports.last_img read more


first_imgUlcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is most frequently seen in young adults. It is a chronic illness, of which the severity is classified as mild-to-moderate or moderate-to-severe. Most patients experience mild-to-moderate symptoms, with periods of remission and relapse. About 15 to 30 percent of patients with IBD have a family member with the disease. There is research underway to find out if a certain gene or a group of genes makes a person more likely to have IBD.The guideline is accompanied by a technical review: that is a compilation of the clinical evidence based on which these recommendations were framed. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 10 2019Most patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have mild-to-moderate disease characterized by periods of activity or remission, but practice variations exist in disease management. A new clinical guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of AGA, addresses the medical management of these patients, focusing on use of both oral and topical 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) medications, rectal corticosteroids and oral budesonide, to promote high-quality care for UC patients.AGA’s new clinical guideline is meant to help with the management of patients with mild-to-moderate UC, but not all patients will effectively respond to the outlined therapies. In those cases, there may be a need to escalate treatment to systemic corticosteroids, immunomodulators and/or biologic therapies for induction and maintenance of remission. However, the use of biologic therapies and/or immunomodulators are not specifically addressed within the guideline.Mild-to-moderate UC was defined as patients with fewer than four to six bowel movements per day, mild or moderate rectal bleeding, absence of constitutional symptoms, low overall inflammatory burden, and absence of features suggestive of high inflammatory activity. Although disease activity exists on a spectrum, patients in the mild-to-moderate category who have more frequent bowel movements, more prominent rectal bleeding or greater overall inflammatory burden should be considered to have moderate disease.The guideline recommends the following for the medical management of mild-to-moderate UC: Use either standard dose mesalamine (2-3 grams/day) or diazo-bonded 5-ASA rather than low dose mesalamine, sulfasalazine or no treatment in patients with extensive mild-moderate UC. (Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence) In patients with extensive or left-sided mild-moderate UC, add rectal mesalamine to oral 5-ASA. (Conditional recommendation, moderate quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate UC with suboptimal response to standard-dose mesalamine or diazo-bonded 5-ASA or with moderate disease activity, use high-dose mesalamine (>3 g/d) with rectal mesalamine. (Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence [induction of remission], low-quality evidence [maintenance of remission]) In patients with mild-moderate UC being treated with oral mesalamine, use once-daily dosing rather than multiple times per day dosing. (Conditional recommendation, moderate quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate UC, use standard-dose oral mesalamine or diazo-bonded 5-ASA, rather than budesonide MMX or controlled ileal-release budesonide for induction of remission. (Conditional recommendation, low quality of evidence) In patients with mild-moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis or proctitis, use mesalamine enemas (or suppositories) rather than oral mesalamine. (Conditional recommendation, very-low-quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis who choose rectal therapy over oral therapy, use mesalamine enemas rather than rectal corticosteroids. (Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate ulcerative proctitis who choose rectal therapy over oral therapy, use mesalamine suppositories. (Strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis or proctitis being treated with rectal therapy who are intolerant of or refractory to mesalamine suppositories, use rectal corticosteroid therapy rather than no therapy for induction of remission. (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate UC refractory to optimized oral and rectal 5-ASA, regardless of disease extent, add either oral prednisone or budesonide MMX. (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence) In patients with mild-moderate UC , AGA makes no recommendation for use of probiotics. (No recommendation, knowledge gap) In patients with mild-moderate UC despite 5-ASA therapy, AGA makes no recommendation for use of curcumin. (No recommendation, knowledge gap) In patients with mild-moderate UC without Clostridium difficile infection, AGA recommends fecal microbiota transplantation be performed only in the context of a clinical trial. (No recommendation for treatment of ulcerative colitis, knowledge gap)center_img Source:https://www.gastro.org/press-release/new-guideline-provides-recommendations-for-the-treatment-of-mild-to-moderate-ulcerative-colitislast_img read more